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Financial Aid

BY THE NUMBERS

Financial Aid
BY THE NUMBERS

The Sticker Price of College

Community colleges are less expensive for students than other types of colleges are.

Average published tuition and fees for full-time students, 2016–17

Sticker Price of College Legend
Sticker Price of College Legend
Price of College Graph

The Net Price for Students

Compared with the sticker prices above, the average net tuition and fees (tuition and fees minus grants and tax credits) for college are much lower. At community colleges, the average net tuition and fees is actually negative.

Average net tuition and fees for full-time students, 2016–17

Sticker Price of College Legend
Sticker Price of College Legend
Cost of attendance

Beyond net price, there has been increasing concern about the broader costs for students of attending college, including books, transportation, and living expenses. The net cost of attendance in 2011–12 for full-time community college students was $11,280.

Cost of attendance

Beyond net price, there has been increasing concern about the broader costs for students of attending college, including books, transportation, and living expenses. The net cost of attendance in 2011–12 for full-time community college students was $11,280.

Who Gets Grants?

Community college students are less likely than students in other sectors to complete the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA).

FAFSA application rates, 2011–12

%

Community Colleges

%

Public Four-Year Colleges

%

Private Nonprofit Four-Year Colleges

%

For-Profit Colleges

FAFSA applications

A push to have more students fill out the FAFSA, which is required for most types of federal, state, and institutional aid, has increased the FAFSA application rate at community colleges from only 43 percent in 2007–08 (NPSAS 2007–08).

FAFSA applications

A push to have more students fill out the FAFSA, which is required for most types of federal, state, and institutional aid, has increased the FAFSA application rate at community colleges from only 43 percent in 2007–08 (NPSAS 2007–08).

Community college students are no more likely than students in other sectors (and, in fact, are less likely than students at for-profit colleges) to receive Federal Pell Grants.

Pell Grant receipt among undergraduates, 2011–12

%

Community Colleges

%

Public Four-Year Colleges

%

Private Nonprofit Four-Year Colleges

%

For-Profit Colleges

So what?

This is a problem because many more community college students are low-income and eligible for Pell Grants.

So what?

This is a problem because many more community college students are low-income and eligible for Pell Grants.

Who Is at Risk of Losing Grants?

Pell Grant eligibility is initially based on financial need, but recipients must meet Satisfactory Academic Progress (SAP) requirements to remain eligible past the first year.

Pell recipients failing to meet the typical 2.0 GPA standard for SAP, 2012

%

Community Colleges

%

Public Four-Year Colleges

%

Private Nonprofit Four-Year Colleges

Students at risk

Students can also fail SAP standards by failing to complete enough credits. That brings the percentage of community college students at risk to around 40 percent.

Students at risk

Students can also fail SAP standards by failing to complete enough credits. That brings the percentage of students at risk to around 40 percent.

Who Gets Federal Work-Study Aid?

Currently, Federal Work-Study provides disproportionate support to students at selective, private institutions, where the average family income of recipients is higher.

Federal Work-Study aid receipt among undergraduates, 2011–12

%

Community Colleges

%

Public Four-Year Colleges

%

Private Nonprofit Four-Year Colleges

Working while in college

Sixty-nine percent of community college students work while in college, with 33 percent working 35 or more hours a week. But very few get Federal Work-Study aid.

Working while in college

Sixty-nine percent of community college students work while in college, with 33 percent working 35 or more hours a week. But very few get Federal Work-Study aid.

Who Takes Out Loans?

The percentage of community college students who have any loans has increased notably but remains far lower than in other sectors.

Percentage of undergraduates who had any loans, 2009

%

Community Colleges

%

Public Four-Year Colleges

%

Private Nonprofit Four-Year Colleges

%

For-Profit Colleges

More defaults, fewer loans

Community college students have high default rates, but far fewer students take out loans initially.

More defaults, fewer loans

Community college students have high default rates but far fewer students take out loans initially.

Center for Analysis of Postsecondary Education and Employment, Teachers College, Columbia University

525 West 120th Street, Box 174, New York, NY 10027

TEL: 212.678.3091 | FAX: 212.678.3699

The Center for Analysis of Postsecondary Education and Employment was established in the summer of 2011 through a grant (R305C110011) from the Institute of Education Sciences (IES) of the U.S. Department of Education.

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