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Veronica Minaya

Veronica MinayaVeronica Minaya is a researcher at the Politecnico di Milano, Italy, and a visiting scholar at the Community College Research Center at Teachers College, Columbia University. At CCRC, Dr. Minaya conducted quantitative research on estimating the impact of the Federal Work-Study program on student outcomes, as well as on measuring performance of higher education. She is currently studying labor markets returns to detailed educational paths using administrative data.

Dr. Minaya holds a PhD in economics and education from Teachers College, Columbia University. She holds an MA in public administration and international development from Harvard University and a BA in economics from Universidad del Pacifico of Peru. Her dissertation included three studies in which she applied quantitative methods to current issues in financial aid and college major choices with a particular focus on the effects of institutional grading policies on underrepresented minorities.

Prior to joining CCRC, Dr. Minaya worked as a consultant for the World Bank, where she was involved in several impact evaluation studies in education and rural development, in the design and implementation of a monitoring and evaluation system of two education programs in Afghanistan, and in the preliminary research phase for academic resilience and strengthening and building education systems in conflict-affected countries.

Dr. Minaya’s primary research fields are economics of higher education and labor economics; secondary fields include public finance, program evaluation, and education policy.

Presentations

Breakout 2C: Working While Enrolled in College
Thursday, April 6, 3:30–5:00 PM

Center for Analysis of Postsecondary Education and Employment, Teachers College, Columbia University
525 West 120th Street, Box 174, New York, NY 10027
TEL: 212.678.3091 | FAX: 212.678.3699
The Center for Analysis of Postsecondary Education and Employment was established in the summer of 2011 through a grant (R305C110011) from the Institute of Education Sciences (IES) of the U.S. Department of Education.
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